norest4theweary

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Archive for the tag “mentally ill”

Economic Inequality in America: The Mentally Ill are Easily Looked Over Con’t

Below is a video found on Al Jazeera, called, “The War Within,” it was posted on April, 20, 2010. The video focuses on US war veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). But it is important to recognize that most people in the military today come from low-income, working-class, and middle-class families. This is because the military provides, ‘perks,’ for joining, for example, ‘free,’ education or a check twice a month. The relationship today between the less-fortunate and war is interesting to me because I believe the this is another example of how the powerful elite influence our everyday lives.

If you did not know, war is really profitable if you are in the right place in society. Companies from, General Electric, to McDonalds benefit from war, I mean millions of dollars. These companies are the same companies that you will see paying lobbyist money to force their agenda. Did you forget that we were looking for weapons of mass destruction?

When you have economic inequality you do not need a draft. People who have no other option but to join the army because, they can get tax free housing or family supplemental sustainability allowance. Will risk their lives to better the condition of their family.

I do not hesitate to say that the powerful elites are very smart people. They provide a economic environment, if I can put it that way, that automatically supplies them able bodies because that is all they really want is bodies. To fight in wars killing people who they do not like for whatever reason and they make an enormous profit from it. These lobbyist do not care one bit about the people in the military, this video can shine some light on this. I recall watching a documentary awhile back, I do not remember the name of it or when it was; I do remember it was on Al Jazeera, so maybe I will find it later. Nonetheless, the part of the video that stood out to me went something like this: the footage was of a soldier complaining that at his base in Iraq or Afghanistan, his soldiers can at any given time of the day go to the canteen and get McDonalds but they can not get ammunition or special vehicles. Well at least at that point the US was an advocate of, Food Not Bombs.

So soldiers here leave to fight a war that they do not understand at all. Look at how many soldiers leave the wars in the middle east, asking why was I there killing people? There is no justification. Not to forget that the soldier leaves the battlefield a totally different person, mentally and in some cases physically.

This question and psychological trauma that war puts on people contributes to the statistic that comes about month after month, that more US soldiers took their own lives than died in battle.

Below is a video on Democracy Now, it features a program called, “Military Suicide Epidemic: More U.S. Soldiers Have Killed Themselves Than Died on Battlefield in 2012,” posted on June 13, 2012. the special program begins at 42:03.

Peace!

Reference:

Guina, Ryan. (2008, July 9). Do Military Members Get paid Enough. http://themilitarywallet.com/do-military-members-get-paid-enough/

http://www.aljazeera.com/focus/2010/02/20102685951740629.html

http://www.democracynow.org/2012/10/5/on_afghan_war_11th_anniversary_vets

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Economic Inequality in America: The Mentally Ill are Easily Looked Over

The discussion of homelessness cannot take place without the inclusion of the topic of the mentally ill. I am sure that at some point in your life you have casually passed by a homeless person who was definitely talking to themselves or acting in a way that you might find obnoxious. During these times, I bet that you probably concluded on two reasons for why that person is talking to themselves: either the person is on drugs or the person is mentally ill. I believe too often the first option is chosen because the average individual does not know the trials and tribulations that affect the mentally ill. Very few know how much mentally ill people suffer and how much this society directly and indirectly neglects them.

In America the streets are covered with the mentally ill. Some studies show that 50% (it could be as high as 80%) of all homeless people are mentally ill.

Below is a video that looks at the lives of some mentally ill people in America. It is a very good video to introduce this topic. I like the positive aspect of the video that shows people who understand mentally illness and are using their knowledge and solidarity to help the homeless.

The video is found on Al Jazeera, it is called,”Lost and Found,” and it was posted on November 21, 2010.

Below is text from the Al Jazeera website:

Filmmaker: Peggy Holter

According to the US’ substance abuse and mental health services sdministration “as many as 700,000 Americans are homeless on any given night. An estimated 20 to 25 per cent of these people have a serious mental illness”.

The number of people who are homeless in the US has always been a stunning statistic that seems to run counter to the promise of the American Dream. In the past two years, compounded by the deep recession, it is a statistic that has only gotten substantially worse.

There has long been a public policy debate about whether it is homelessness that leads many of those who are mentally ill to wind up on the street or if because they are already an at-risk population and their mental illness grows more severe by the difficult reality of living on the street with no support, no family care and few viable solutions.

A large and growing homeless population is evident in every major city in the US. In Washington, DC it is seen as especially remarkable because so much of it is visible from the halls of power where government entities are meant to find solutions to these issues. Instead the nation’s capital has one of the largest homeless populations – about 40,000 people.

Among that number there is a seemingly equally intractable issue, the mentally ill homeless. For the past 30 years this number has grown substantially as the support services provided to them have been eroded. It is now believed that the percentage of those among the homeless who are mentally ill is close to 40 per cent across the country.

During the 1980s, the indigent mentally ill would be institutionalised by court order until they were successfully treated or other resources could be found to support them. When that policy ended it led to a surge in the number of mentally ill homeless and that has continued to grow in the following decades.

Vagrancy charges were frequently used to get many of the homeless, including the mentally ill, off the streets. But this led only to short-term housing solutions with no connection to long-term mental health care. Further, it led to petty crime cases clogging court dockets.

Some alternative health care solutions are available, including short-term stints under a doctor’s care and prescriptions for medication to treat many of the disorders that are most common among this population, such as schizophrenia. But being homeless and without any long-term financial support often means that regular access to prescriptions and maintaining a schedule with a therapist is almost impossible.Over the years countless efforts have been made to address this issue at governmental and charity levels. But there is a conflict between those who believe that providing housing should be a primary concern because mental illness exists regardless of whether or not somebody has a home and those who believe that only when the reasons behind homelessness – be it mental illness, substance abuse or economic need – are resolved, can stable housing be provided by the government.

It is in this swirl of debate that we found David and Nellie – each with their own troubled journey and issues. Their cases are different, as are the solutions outlined in this film.

There are a number of initiatives that are being pursued in Washington. One is a court-based programme that is devoted strictly to providing a non-incarceration route for the mentally ill who have been arrested for petty crimes.

Another solution that is outlined in this film is part of a non-profit organisation called Pathways to Housing. It was founded in the early 1990s by Sam Tsemberis and now operates in a number of cities across the US. Its goal is to provide stable and ultimately affordable housing to those in greatest need among the homeless, whether they are mentally ill, recovering from substance abuse or simply navigating the difficult transition back from economic ruin.

Peace!

Reference:

http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/witness/2010/11/201011166511982384.html

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